Austin Bayley

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How Can A Hot Tub Still Be Refreshing In Hot Weather? Read Here To Find Out, Plus Tips & Tricks!

Posted by Austin Bayley on May 30, 2018 8:16:08 AM

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Even as a big proponent of hot tubs and their virtues, I still occasionally experience difficulty in believing that hot tubs are refreshing in warm summer weather. Slipping into a hot tub on a stifling day hardly sounds fun, right? However incredulous it may seem, it's absolutely accurate that a hot tub can be a wonderful relief. A hot tub truly is a year round product that offers the same level of enjoyment whether it is a freezing winter day dipping into the negatives or a sweltering summer heat wave nearing or cresting triple digits. The problem is that sometimes we associate the temperature of water like we do with that of the air. Think about it: stand outside in 33 degree temperatures and it is certainly cold, but it is nothing like being submerged in 33 degree water, where your life is in peril.

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It all comes down to the simple fact that any water temperature below our internal body temperature (98.6 F) is going to have a cooling effect because it is absorbing heat that we are producing. Water has the unique property of absorbing an enormous amount of heat, even if the thermometer says the temperature is low. Quick science lesson: heat is a measure of molecular activity, while temperature is the intensity of that activity. We think of a lot of water we encounter like ponds, lakes, and pools as being cold, and indeed the temperature probably is cold. There is, however, a large amount of heat in that body of water because there is a lot of water molecule activity; the molecules just might not be experiencing a lot of activity and thus resulting in a lower temperature. Simply turning a tub down between a range of 80 F and a several degrees lower than your body temperature will deliver a refreshing soak (personally, I prefer between 90 and 92 F). As you sit in a hot tub with water in this temperature range swirling around you, the water is drawing heat from your body and working to cool you down. It provides a revitalizing escape, but without the bracing shock of cold water that you might find in a cooler pool or lake.

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How do you enjoy the benefits of a cooler tub? Check out our tips below.

Tips & tricks for making your tub cooler. These tips make the assumption that you set the temperature on the tub to your desired number:

  • Drain your tub while simultaneously filling it up with cool water from the garden hose. This is a quick fix to drop the temperature of your tub quickly in one session. It also acts to replace some of the water in your tub if you have not replaced it recently.
  • Run the air jets (if your tub is equipped) with the hot tub cover open. This will help heat dissipate quicker from your tub.
  • If you’re really in a pinch, you can even dump a bag of store bought ice into the tub to absorb some heat and bring the temperature down.

There are also virtues of having a warm tub in the mornings and evenings of summer. Soaking in a warmer tub in the mornings and evenings provides a refreshing environment for the senses to awaken and muscles to limber up for a day of activity; conversely, it provides a way to relax and relieve muscle tension in achy limbs and joints during the evening after an active day.

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Tags: Using Hot Tub In Warm Weather

Benefits of Saunas on Men's Brain and Heart Health

Posted by Austin Bayley on May 15, 2018 1:56:46 PM

 

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Regular visits to the sauna can help lower the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease as well as dying of heart ailments, a Finnish study suggests.

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland found a link between sauna visits and memory diseases after following more than 2,300 middle-aged Finnish men for more than 20 years.

In the study, men who went to the sauna four to seven times a week were found 66 percent less likely to be diagnosed with dementia, and 65 percent less likely with Alzheimer’s disease, than those taking a sauna once a week.

“We have taken into account other lifestyle factors, like physical activity and socioeconomic factors ... There is an independent effect of sauna on these outcomes,” said Jari Laukkanen, senior researcher and a professor of clinical medicine at the University of Eastern Finland.

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He noted that the study only indicated an association between the sauna and memory diseases, and the findings would have to be fleshed out through further studies with different age groups, other nationalities and women.

The findings, published in the journal Age and Ageing in December, suggested however that the health benefits of sauna could extend from the heart to the brain.

Previous results of the follow-up study have shown that men who spent time in a sauna seven times a week were less likely to die of heart problems, compared to those who only partook once a week. “In the sauna, the heart rate increases and we start to sweat. This is a bit like physical exercise,” Laukkonen said.

“After sauna, you may have lower blood pressure, and blood pressure is an important risk factor in cardiovascular and memory diseases. This may be one possible explanation for our findings,” Laukkanen said.

Regular bathers at the Finnish Sauna Society, which has around 4,200 members in Helsinki, agree that good health many be linked to the relaxing effects of sauna visits.

Club members go to the sauna several times a week, and in winter cool off with a swim in the icy Baltic Sea.

“I feel relaxed after sauna, and it’s a place where I can have a nice conversation with my friends. The social aspect is the best thing about sauna, when you get older,” Hannu Pitkanen, a senior member of the sauna society, told Reuters.

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Reproduced from Reuters article.

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